Presidency Has Drafted a Plan to Relax SA Lockdown Rules

Picture: @PresidencyZA, Twitter
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News 24 reported that the government wants to relax some of the nationwide lockdown rules based on a draft discussion document prepared by the Presidency.

“Confirming the validity of the draft document, Presidential spokesperson Khusela Diko said it was prepared as an early input into the development of a “risk-adjusted approach” to resuming economic activity.”

Diko added that the document had changed substantially and should not be relied on for accurate information. It is being finalised and will be discussed by President Cyril Ramaphosa on Thursday evening.

According to Reuters, the draft document said, “sit-in restaurants, hotels, bars, conference centres, cinemas, sporting events, and religious gatherings will remain shut after the lockdown ends, regardless of the risk level. No gatherings of more than 10 people outside of a workplace will be permitted.”

Business Insider wrote the document proposes “a five-level approach, with different restrictions applying depending on the speed at which the coronavirus is spreading, and how ready the health system is to deal with cases of COVID-19.”

Picture: Business Insider
  • Level 5 – We are currently at level 5 which is the hard lockdown in South Africa, where you can only buy essentials.
  • Level 4 – We can buy essentials and even non-essential things from stores that are already open to selling food, but not alcohol. Postal delivery, E-hailing and taxis will be allowed at all times but with limited passengers. The agricultural industry (including wine-making), open-cast mining, and all financial and professional services are also allowed to open.
  • Level 3 – Some domestic air travel will return, but with limited flights per day, authorisation is required for travel. Consumers can buy takeaway food and order from Uber Eats and Mr. D. Online stores can sell and deliver. Clothing stores will open. Sales of alcohol. Sales of stationery, cellphones, and computers and books. Carmaking, chemical, and Transnet industries can reopen.
  • Level 2 – Domestic workers can return to work, and informal waste-pickers can start working. Domestic flights are fully operational. All retail, manufacturing, and construction will be allowed and miners would not have capacity limits. All government services, and installation and maintenance workers return.
  • Level 1 – Only limitations would be hygiene requirements for public transport and unspecified “restrictions on international travel”.

Government will weigh the risk of transmission within each industry, the expected impact of a continued lockdown as well as its value to the economy.